The Inheritance: Part 2 Tickets

Noel Coward Theatre St Martin's Lane, London, WC2N 4AU
Important Info
The Inheritance: Part 2 Child Policy

Recommended age: 14+

Children are welcome at all Delfont Mackintosh Theatres, but this may be subject to individual production age restrictions due to content. If any age restrictions for productions apply we shall advise you prior to the performance.

All persons aged under 16 must be accompanied and sat next to the accompanying adult. They may not sit on their own within the auditorium. If children do have separate seats, entry could be refused.

All patrons, regardless of age, must present a valid ticket to gain entry to the theatre. Please ensure that any children or infants for whom you are responsible also have a valid ticket. Your child should be able to sit unaided within the purchased seat. We do not allow children to be seated on an adult’s lap or babes in arms.


Content

Contains male nudity and themes of a sexual nature.


Important Information

This show consists of 2 parts and is intended to be seen sequentially. All persons aged under 16 must be accompanied and sat next to the accompanying adult. They may not sit on their own within the auditorium. If children do have separate seats, entry could be refused. All patrons, regardless of age, must present a valid ticket to gain entry to the theatre. Please ensure that any children or infants for whom you are responsible also have a valid ticket. Your child should be able to sit unaided within the purchased seat. We do not allow children to be seated on an adult’s lap or babes in arms.
Performance Timings
Monday - -
Tuesday - 19:15
Wednesday - 19:15
Thursday - -
Friday - 19:15
Saturday - 19:15
Sunday - -
Show Info

Book The Inheritance: Part 2 Tickets

Matthew Lopez’s stunning two-part play The Inheritance comes to the West End’s Noel Coward Theatre.

Following a sell-out run at the Young Vic that had theatre critics glowing with praise and people clambering for tickets, The Inheritance is making its way to the Noel Coward Theatre. Matthew Lopez’s incredible masterpiece was inspired by E.M. Forster’s Howard’s End and is directed by two-time Olivier and two-time Tony award-winning director Stephen Daldry.

Taking place in New York City a generation after the AIDs epidemic The Inheritance tells the story of what it is like to be a young gay man in this day and age by following a group of young gay men who are determined to succeed. What do we owe those who came before us and those who will come after us?

Featuring the Tony, Olivier, Oscar, and Emmy winning actress Vanessa Redgrave, on stage in the West End for the first time in 7 years, The Inheritance stars Tony winner John Benjamin Hickey alongside Hugo Bolton, Robert Boulter, Andrew Burnap, Hubert Burton, Paul Hilton, Samuel H. Levine, Syrus Lowe, Michael Marcus, Kyle Soller and Michael Walters.

This touching, engaging and hilarious show is presented in two parts and is intended to be viewed sequentially. Don’t forget to book your tickets to The Inheritance: Part 1

Perhaps the most important American play of the century so far.’ Daily Telegraph

‘monumental and transcendent'
Time Out

remarkably involving production
Independent


The Inheritance: Part 2 Synopsis

What is it like to be a young gay man in New York a generation after the peak of the AIDs epidemic? What does it mean to stand on the shoulders of those who have come before you? What is owed to the future and the people around you? How many words are there for pain and for love?

Spanning generations and countless interlinking lives, The Inheritance brilliantly transposes E.M. Forster’s novel ‘Howards End’ to 21st century New York in an achingly tender critically-acclaimed two-part drama.


The Inheritance: Part 2 Child Policy

Recommended age: 14+

Children are welcome at all Delfont Mackintosh Theatres, but this may be subject to individual production age restrictions due to content. If any age restrictions for productions apply we shall advise you prior to the performance.

All persons aged under 16 must be accompanied and sat next to the accompanying adult. They may not sit on their own within the auditorium. If children do have separate seats, entry could be refused.

All patrons, regardless of age, must present a valid ticket to gain entry to the theatre. Please ensure that any children or infants for whom you are responsible also have a valid ticket. Your child should be able to sit unaided within the purchased seat. We do not allow children to be seated on an adult’s lap or babes in arms.


Content

Contains male nudity and themes of a sexual nature.


Important Information

This show consists of 2 parts and is intended to be seen sequentially. All persons aged under 16 must be accompanied and sat next to the accompanying adult. They may not sit on their own within the auditorium. If children do have separate seats, entry could be refused. All patrons, regardless of age, must present a valid ticket to gain entry to the theatre. Please ensure that any children or infants for whom you are responsible also have a valid ticket. Your child should be able to sit unaided within the purchased seat. We do not allow children to be seated on an adult’s lap or babes in arms.

Important information

Running time
3hr 20min (inc. interval)
Booking Until
Sat, 19 January 2019
Cast

The Inheritance: Part 2 Cast

Hugo Bolton
Robert Boulter
Andrew Burnap
Hubert Burton
John Benjamin Hickey
Paul Hilton
Samuel H. Levine
Syrus Lowe
Michael Marcus
Vanessa Redgrave
Kyle Soller
Luke Thallon
Michael Walters
Vanessa Redgrave


Creative Team

By Matthew Lopez

Inspired By The Novel Howards End by E. M. Forster

Direction Stephen Daldry

Design Bob Crowley

Light Jon Clark

Sound Paul Arditti & Chris Reid

Music Paul Englishby

UK Casting Julia Horan CDG

US Casting Jordan Thaler CSA & Heidi Griffiths CSA

Associate Director Justin Martin

Dramaturg Elizabeth Williamson

Dialect William Conacher

Fights Terry King

Jerwood Assistant Director Sadie Spencer
Reviews

The Inheritance: Part 2 Critics & Reviews

The Inheritance, Young Vic review: perhaps the most important American play of the century so far

*****


To watch The Inheritance is to pass from engaged but detached interest into a realm of total absorption before arriving at a state of emotionally shattered but elated awe. Divided into two parts and running to six hours (excluding intervals), Matthew Lopez’s American epic of gay lives present and past invites comparison with Tony Kushner’s 1990s master-work Angels in America; the astounding thing is it withstands that scrutiny.

It also stands consciously in the shadow of EM Forster’s Howards End (1910): it incorporates elements of the novel, an incarnation of the author and, in Stephen Daldry’s immaculately staged world-premiere, stars Vanessa Redgrave (who was in the 1992 Merchant Ivory film) as the sole female character. She provides the heart-rending pay-off to a theatrical marathon that instantly looks like a modern classic, perhaps the most important American play of the century so far.

The idea of ‘inheritance’ develops in manifold ways. In the first instance, the emphasis is literary. A young man (who we will come to identify as an actor called Adam, and also his down-and-out rent-boy doppelganger Leo) is attempting, amid a chorus of thrusty-angsty budding-writer types, to find a route into ‘his’ story about his friends. Enter the figure – stiff, suited, Edwardian English – of Forster like a creative-writing fairy-godfather. ‘Morgan’, as he’s familiarly known, spurs the youth into an act of appropriation.

The casual opening line of Howards End – “One may as well begin with Helen’s letters to her sister” becomes “One may as well begin with Toby’s voicemails” and we get a pungent introductory anecdote about the latter (dashing novelist, narcissist, Broadway contender too) drunkenly heaving his guts over Meryl Streep at a party in the Hamptons, upstate New York.

With Paul Hilton’s ‘Morgan’ by turns watching and encouraging those concerned to dig deeper into themselves, registering with quiet fascination the tactility, sexual freedom and rights unknown to his age of closeted homosexuality, what begins as a larky, camply arch ‘work-shop’ (like a Greenwich Village answer to Hector’s lessons in The History Boys) draws you into a richly imagined world that has the innate thrill of a page-turner.

The most overt ‘theft’ from the novel concerns the pivotal, thwarted inheritance of an old farm-house owned by the dying Walter (again portrayed by Hilton, loosely the Ruth Wilcox ‘role’ in the book, played in the film by Redgrave). Walter bequeaths the house to the kindly, self-doubting, struggling Eric (Kyle Soller), the suddenly spurned husband-to-be of Andrew Burnap’s fickle Toby - only for Walter’s death-bed will to be destroyed by his long-term partner: the rich, Trump-supporting Republican Henry.

The arc of this complex, often waspishly funny and physically uninhibited tale (openly narrated, RSC Nicholas Nickleby-style, as it gallops along) drives towards an understanding that the rustic idyll where Walter once tended to dying, stigmatised Aids-infected men belongs at a spiritual level to Eric.

With its beautiful cherry tree dating back to George Washington, it emblemises the good society America found, in isolated pockets, amid the devastation wrought by the Eighties ‘plague’ but which must blossom again as the legacy of those years, registered in self-destructive, emotionally self-protective behaviour, lingers cruelly on.

What’s stunning is that something so overt in its themes should make you feel you’re living and breathing the issues, not being lectured about them. The performances are (to a man in this almost all-male affair_ exquisitely truthful – doubly so from Samuel H Levine as the contrastingly preyed-upon Adam and Leo.

Stephen Daldry’s fleet, astute production, deploying an often bare-foot ensemble of 13 on and around a simple raised (subtly convertible) platform, is sparing in its visual elements and ‘big’ moments so that when they land, they land hard.

Part One ends with the heart-rending sight of young men in their prime – the ghosts of those who died after contracting Aids – clustering in silent amity around Eric. Part Two holds back Redgrave’s achingly frail appearance like a final release yet shows this silver-haired mother, still mourning the gay son she spurned and saw dying (“his voice no more than a croak”), as having found almost none herself. Star ratings are almost beside the point when confronted by work of this magnitude but hell, yeah, five.


By :Dominic Cavendish

Ref Link : Telegraph
Venue Info

Noel Coward Theatre

St Martin's Lane, London, WC2N 4AU

VIEW SEATING PLAN

Noel Coward Theatre

Address: 85-88 St Martin's Lane, London, WC2N 4AU
Capacity: 872


The Noël Coward Theatre opened on 12th March 1903. Back then it was named the New Theatre. Designed by W. G. R. Sprague, who designed several West End theatres, the exterior takes on a classical style, with a lavish interior in a Rococo style. The theatre was commissioned by Sir Charles Wyndham who’s other theatre, the Wyndham’s Theatre, sits behind the Noël Coward. A major refurbishment took place in 2006, though most of the theatres original features and design have been retained, and it is notable for its use of white and gold in its interior, and the portrait medallions that line the walls, depicting French Kings and Queens.

In 1973 the theatre’s name was changed from the New Theatre to the Albery Theatre, as a tribute to the theatre’s long-serving manager Sir Bronson Albery. Sir Cameron Mackintosh acquired the theatre through his company, Delfont Mackintosh Theatres, in 2005 and renamed the theatre the Noël Coward Theatre in memory of the famous playwright, who had also appeared at the theatre in 1920 in the first play of his to be performed in the West End, I’ll Leave It To You.

The theatre famously played host to two theatre companies whose theatres were destroyed during the Blitz – the Old Vic and Sadler’s Wells both performed at the theatre until their new theatres were built in the 1950s. The theatre also played host to the premiere of Lionel Bart’s world famous musical Oliver! The show was a huge success, running for 2,618 performances.

Several notable actors have appeared in productions at the theatre, including Roger Rees, Judi Dench, Vanessa Redgrave, Helen Mirren, Patrick Stewart and Jim Broadbent.


Seating

The auditorium has four levels - Stalls, Royal Circle, Grand Circle and Balcony.

The Stalls offers excellent views throughout, with the Royal Circle overhang only affecting the view from seats in Row S onwards. The raking of the seat isn't noticable in the front 5 rows, but the high setting of the stage allows for good views.

The view from the Royal Circle is completely unobstructed and the seating is well raked.

The Grand Circle is set fairly high, but again offers unobstructed views of the stage. The legroom is slightly narrow, however.

Whilst the Balcony is very high, the seats are well raked and comfortable with a good amount of legroom.


Infra-red system
with 12 headsets. Deposit required. Collect headsets from centre desk in foyer - reserve by calling box office. Induction loop at box office.

Guide dogs allowed inside the auditorium, or they can be looked after by theatre staff (maximum 2). Please ask when booking.

There is a ramp (gradient 30-40%, handrail on right-hand side) through the second side EXIT door on St Martin’s Court. Box M (door 68cm wide) has 2 spaces for wheelchair/scooter users, or 1 wheelchair user and a companion. Companions can also be seated in the Royal Circle. Transfer seating available to any aisle seat in Royal Circle. 2 wheelchairs and 2 scooters maximum. Wheelchairs stored in the cloakroom, scooters in the foyer. Groups should ring in advance.

Women’s off the foyer with 2 steps up inside the door. Men’s off the foyer. More at Stalls, Grand Circle and Balcony levels.

No adapted toilet, but customers are welcome to use the toilet in the Duke of York's (approx 100m). You may also be able to use the Men’s toilet which is off the foyer - staff will clear this for you.

Seats with the most legroom are H5, H6, H24, H25 in the Royal Circle and A8, A22, E25 F4 and all of row AA in the Stalls.

3 licensed bars. Drinks and ice-creams can be brought into the auditorium. Pit bar 3 steps up from the back of Stalls. Stalls bar 18 steps down from foyer. Grand Circle bar 30 steps up from foyer. All have moveable seats.

Public phone/credit card telephone to the right of the foyer through a door.


Facilities At Noel Coward Theatre 

Seat plan: Noel Coward Theatre Seat Plan
Facilities: Air conditioned
Bar
Disabled toilets
Infrared hearing loop
Toilets
Wheelchair accessible

Nearest tube: Leicester Square
Tube lines: Piccadilly, Northern
Location: West End
Railway station: Charing Cross
Bus numbers: (Charing Cross) 24, 29, 176; (Strand) 6, 9, 11, 13, 15, 23, 87, 91, 139
Night bus numbers: (Charing Cross) 24, 176, N5, N20, N29, N41, N279; (Strand) 6, 23, 139, N9, N15, N11, N13, N21, N26, N44, N47, N87, N89, N91, N155, N343, N551
Car park: St Martin's Lane Hotel (1min)
Within congestion zone?: Yes
Directions from tube: (2mins) Take Cranbourn Street away from Leicester Square until St Martin’s Lane, where you head right until you reach the theatre.
 

Photos

The Inheritance: Part 2 Photo Gallery