The Magic Flute Tickets

London Coliseum St Martin's Lane, London, WC2N 4ES
Important Info
Language

Sung in English. Our surtitles system projects lyrics above the stage.
Performance Timings
Monday - -
Tuesday - 19:30
Wednesday - -
Thursday - 19:30
Friday - -
Saturday 15:00 -
Sunday - -
Show Info

Book The Magic Flute Tickets

Following his success with The Encounter at the Barbican, Simon McBurney’s five-star production of The Magic Flute returns to ENO, concerning the search for truth and reason, love and enlightenment.

Mozart‘s timeless classic follows the adventures of Prince Tamino and the bird-catcher Papageno on their quest to rescue Pamina. To assist their mission, they are given musical instruments enhanced with magical powers, which they deploy to conquer the trials and tribulations placed in their path towards a deeper understanding of true love and happiness.

The cast includes Lucy Crowe as Pamina and Rupert Charlesworth singing Tamino, alongside Thomas Oliemans, as Papageno. They are joined by company favourite Brindley Sherratt as Sarastro and the sparkling coloratura of Julia Bauer as the manipulative Queen of Night. Conductor Ben Gernon, Principal Guest at the BBC Philharmonic, makes his ENO debut.


Synopsis

One of the greatest operas ever written, Mozart’s timeless classic concerns the search for truth and reason, love and enlightenment.

It follows the adventures of Prince Tamino and the bird-catcher Papageno on their quest to rescue Pamina. To assist their mission, they are given musical instruments enhanced with magical powers, which they deploy to conquer the trials and tribulations placed in their path towards a deeper understanding of true love and happiness.


Act I

Chased by a serpent, Prince Tamino finds himself in an unknown land. He faints and is saved by the Queen of Night’s three Ladies. When Tamino comes to, he is approached by the bird-catcher Papageno.

The Ladies return to give Tamino a portrait of the Queen of Night’s daughter Pamina, who has been kidnapped by the evil Sarastro. Tamino is instantly smitten and the Queen of Night arrives to secure his promise that he will do everything in his power to rescue Pamina from Sarastro’s stronghold. The Prince is given a magic flute and Papageno a set of magic chimes as protection; the instruments have a way of charming both man and beast. Additionally, three spirits, acting as guardians and advisors, will lead the way.

Sarastro’s slave Monostatos pursues Pamina but is frightened away by Papageno, who tells Pamina that he and Tamino have come to rescue her.

Meanwhile the three spirits have led Prince Tamino to Sarastro’s Temple. There, he meets a priest who explains to him that it is the Queen of Night who is evil, not Sarastro. Heartened by the news that Pamina is alive, Tamino begins playing his flute; it reveals its magical properties by bringing the forest to life. Pamina and Papageno hear Tamino’s flute and hasten to find him. But they are intercepted and detained by Monostatos. Papageno’s chimes come to their aid, allowing the bird-catcher and Pamina to escape.

Pamina and Tamino see one another for the first time, and fall into a passionate embrace.


Act II

Sarastro sees Tamino as a future leader of his people, who are in the midst of a grave crisis. But in order to prove himself worthy of the role, and of Pamina, Tamino must first undergo several rigorous trials.

Papageno does not share Tamino’s audacity and is only prepared to accompany him after the promise of a wife as his reward. The Queen of Night’s Ladies arrive and try to seduce the two men into abandoning their allegiance to Sarastro, but Tamino and Papageno hold their nerve and pass their first ordeal.

Monostatos tries to kiss the sleeping Pamina, but is frustrated by the entrance of the Queen of Night. Set on revenge, she charges Pamina with the task of murdering Sarastro. Torn by her devotion to her mother and her love for Tamino, Pamina is at a loss. Sarastro enters, reassuring Pamina that he is not out for vengeance, but strives for understanding and forgiveness.

The second ordeal has begun for Tamino and Papageno: a vow of silence. Papageno heartily ignores this, chattering cheerfully with his companion. Pamina finds them, but believes herself betrayed when Tamino refuses to speak to her. Her happiness dashed, she leaves in despair, but Tamino passes the second test. Papageno, on the other hand, is at his wits’ end. He encounters an old woman who, once he has sworn lifelong fidelity to her, reveals herself as a young girl named Papagena. But as he has disobeyed the vow of silence, she is driven away from him. Papageno’s life now seems futile.

Beside herself with grief, Pamina contemplates suicide, but the three spirits intervene, bringing her and Tamino together for the final trials. Protected by the magic flute, Tamino and Pamina successfully undergo fire and water ordeals. The three spirits also manage to prevent Papageno from killing himself, and the bird-catcher is reunited with his Papagena for good.

The Queen of Night and her Ladies, led by Monostatos, once again try to storm the Temple, but the intruders are caught unawares by Sarastro and cast out by the light of the rising sun. As dawn breaks, Tamino and Pamina are hailed for enduring all the ordeals with beauty and wisdom.


Language

Sung in English. Our surtitles system projects lyrics above the stage.

Important information

Running time
2hrs 55mins
Booking Until
Thu, 11 April 2019
Cast

The Magic Flute Cast

Cast

Rupert Charlesworth
Tamino

Lucy Crowe
Pamina

Thomas Oliemans
Papageno

Brindley Sherratt
Sarastro

Jonathan Lemalu
Sarastro (Apr 9 & 11)
Speaker

Julia Bauer
Queen of Night

David Ireland
Speaker (Apr 9 & 11)
Second Priest/Second Armed Man

Daniel Norman
Monostatos

Eleanor Dennis
First Lady

Samantha Price
Second Lady

Katie Stevenson
Third Lady

Rowan Pierce
Papagena

David Webb
First Priest/First Armed Man


Creative Team

Ben Gernon
Conductor

Chris Hopkins
Conductor (Mar 28)

Simon McBurney
Director

Josie Daxter
Associate Director and Movement

Michael Levine
Set Designer

Nicky Gilliband
Costume Designer

Jean Kalman
Lighting Designer

Mike Gunning
Revival Lighting Designer

Finn Ross
Video Designer

Gareth Fry
Sound Designer

Stephen Jeffreys
Translator
Reviews

The Magic Flute Critics & Reviews

'Truly magical'
The Daily Express


'A life-enhancing achievement'
The Spectator


'Exhilarating'
The Guardian
Venue Info

London Coliseum

St Martin's Lane, London, WC2N 4ES

VIEW SEATING PLAN


London Coliseum

Address: St Martin's Lane, London, WC2N 4ES
Capacity: 2359


With 2,359 seats, the London Coliseum is the largest theatre in London’s West End. It was designed for Sir Oswald Stoll by Frank Matcham, the leading theatre architect of his day.


Quick facts

the London Coliseum has the widest proscenium arch in London (55 feet wide and 34 feet high)
the stage is 80 feet wide, with a throw of over 115 feet from the stage to the back of the balcony
it was one of the first theatres to have electric lighting
it was built with a revolving stage which consisted of three concentric rings and was 75 feet across in total and cost Stoll £70,000
the theatre was one of the first two places in Britain to sell Coca-Cola (the other was Selfridges)

The 'people's palace of entertainment'
The vision was to create a theatre of variety, in the largest and most impressive theatre in London.

Designed by Sir Oswald Stoll, Stoll’s ambition was to create the largest and finest ‘people’s palace of entertainment’ of the age.

The theatre’s original slogan was Pro Bono Publico (for the public good). It was opened in 1904 and the inaugural performance was a variety bill on 24 December that year.

The original programme was a mix of music hall and variety theatre, with the grand finale – a full-scale revolving chariot race – requiring the stage to revolve.


Second World War

The theatre changed its name from the London Coliseum to the Coliseum Theatre between 1931 and 1968.

During the Second World War, the Coliseum served as a canteen for Air Raid Precaution (ARP) wardens, and Winston Churchill gave a speech from the stage.

After 1945 the theatre was mainly used for American musicals before becoming a cinema for seven years from 1961.


The home of opera sung in English

In 1968 the theatre reopened as the London Coliseum, when it also became the home of Sadler’s Wells Opera with a new pit created to accommodate a large opera orchestra.

In 1974 Sadler’s Wells became English National Opera, reflecting the company’s position in the heart of national culture.

As well as being the home of opera sung in English, dance also continued to play an important part in the life of the London Coliseum – a fact that continues to this day with many national and international dance companies performing at the theatre during the breaks between ENO productions.


Restoration

The company bought the freehold of the building for £12.8 million in 1992. The theatre underwent a complete and detailed restoration from 2000 which was supported by National Heritage Lottery Fund, English Heritage, the National Lottery through Arts Council England, Vernon and Hazel Ellis and a number of generous trust and individual donors to whom we are extremely grateful.

The auditorium and other public areas were returned to their original Edwardian decoration and new public spaces were created. An original staircase planned by Frank Matcham was finally put in to his specifications. The theatre re-opened in 2004


Present day

In 2015, ENO announced a plan to open up the London Coliseum with a redevelopment of the front of house spaces, intended to encourage more people in to explore the beautiful interiors of the theatre.

The renovation project focused on the architectural qualities of the Grade II* listed building to reclaim its original Edwardian elegance for a new generation of audiences.


Radio-wave system in the auditorium and induction loop at box office and all bars.

Guide dogs allowed into auditorium, alternatively staff are happy to dog sit in the manager's office.

10 spaces for wheelchair/scooter users in total: 2 at back of Dress circle, 4 in Stall boxes and 4 at back of Stalls (companions can sit beside the wheelchairs users). 10 wheelchair/scooter transfer spaces: 4 in Dress Circle and 6 in Balcony. Theatre also provides 2 wheelchairs for loan.

No steps to toilets off the foyer. More toilets at Dress Circle, Upper Circle (women's 10 steps up), Balcony and Basement.

Adapted toilets at Basement, Stalls, Dress Circle (no steps from lift) and Balcony levels.

Good leg room in stalls; B1-4, B33-36, C1 and C39 in the Stalls provide the best leg room.

No steps to Stalls bar and bars in rear Stalls corridor. Further bars at Balcony, Upper and Dress Circles can be accessed by main lift. Dutch Bar on basement level (reachable by lift) accessed by platform lift or down 3 steps. Drinks cannot be taken into the auditorium.

Telephones are 10 steps down from the foyer


Facilities At London Coliseum 

Seat plan: London Coliseum Seat Plan
Facilities: Air conditioned
Bar
Disabled toilets
Infrared hearing loop
Toilets
Wheelchair accessible

Nearest tube: Leicester Square
Tube lines: Piccadilly, Northern
Location: West End
Railway station: Charing Cross
Bus numbers: 24, 29, 176 / 6, 9, 11, 13, 15, 23, 87, 91, 139
Night bus numbers: 24, 176, N5, N20, N29, N41, N279 / 6, 23, 139, N9, N15, N11, N13, N21, N26, N44, N47, N87, N89, N91, N155, N343, N551
Car park: Q-Park: Chinatown (5mins) / Other: St Martin's Lane Hotel (1min)
Within congestion zone?: Yes
Directions from tube: (3mins) Take Cranbourn Street until St Martin’s Lane, where you head right until you reach the theatre.
Photos

The Magic Flute Photo Gallery