Pressure Tickets

The Ambassadors Theatre West Street, London, WC2H 9ND
Performance Timings
Monday - 19:30
Tuesday - 19:30
Wednesday - 19:30
Thursday 15:00 19:30
Friday - 19:30
Saturday 15:00 19:30
Sunday - -
Show Info

Book Pressure Tickets

Based on the remarkable true story of two warring Allied meteorologists tasked with predicting the weather conditions for the D-Day landings, David Haig's critically acclaimed play Pressure will transfer to the West Ends' Ambassador's Theatre for a limited season from 6 June to 1 September 2018.

The transfer follows a celebrated run at Chichester Festival Theatre (5 stars from the; Daily Telegraph, Observer & Evening Standard), a national tour (in association with Cambridge Arts Theatre and Touring Consortium Company) and a sold out run at the Park Theatre.

David Haig reprises his role as Group Captain James Stagg, alongside Malcolm Sinclair as General Eisenhower and Laura Rogers as Kay Summersby, with further casting to be announced in due course.

David Haig said "I am absolutely thrilled that Pressure is transferring to the West End on 6 June. What sublime timing that my play about the weather forecaster for D-Day, will open on the 74th anniversary of the D-Day invasions. The play has been profoundly fulfilling to write and perform. It's about one of the great unsung heroes of the 20th century and I'm so proud that his story will now be available to a West End audience. I couldn't be more excited."

Pressure is directed by John Dove, with design by Colin Richmond, lighting by Tim Mitchell, sound by Philip Pinsky, video by Andrzej Goulding and casting by Lisa Makin.

Important information

Running time
TBC
Booking Until
Sat, 1 September 2018
Cast

Pressure Cast

David Haig
as James Stagg
until 1 Sep 2018

By: David Haig
Director: John Dove
Lighting: Tim Mitchell
Design: Colin Richmond




Venue Info

The Ambassadors Theatre

West Street, London, WC2H 9ND

VIEW SEATING PLAN


Ambassadors Theatre

Address:
 West Street, London, WC2H 9ND
Capacity: 444

The Ambassadors Theatre opened in 1913, designed by W. G. R. Sprague. It was built as a companion to the nearby St Martin’s Theatre, with the intention of housing smaller productions in a more intimate venue. Its location, opposite The Ivy restaurant, was considered to be ideal for the theatrical elite who frequented the renowned restaurant.

The first play to perform here, Panthea, lasted just 15 nights and the management of the theatre was taken over by Charles B. Cochran who turned the theatre’s success around with the arrival of Paris’ latest form of entertainment, the ‘intimate’ revue. Playing over 400 performances in 1914, Odds and Ends returned in 1915. Dramatic plays made their mark on the theatre in the 1920s, including a performance from Ivor Novello (in Deburau, his stage debut), the premiere of Eugene O’Neill’s play The Emperor Jones, and the opportunity for Laurence Olivier to see the stage debut of his (unbeknownst to him at the time) future wife, Vivien Leigh.

The Ambassadors was the first home for England’s longest-running productions, Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap. The show played here from 1952 until 1973, when it transferred to its companion theatre, the St Martin’s, which is a larger house and could better meet the audience demand for tickets.

Following a change of hands in 1996 to its namesake company the Ambassador Theatre Group, the theatre was redeveloped into two small spaces and the Royal Court held a residency there until 1999 when the venue was returned to its original layout. The name was also changed to New Ambassadors and the theatre played host to more niche productions, the likes of which were normally seen in smaller fringe venues.

It wasn’t until 2007 that the name reverted to The Ambassadors and a thorough refurbishment took place. More commercial type shows began appearing again, such as the Menier Chocolate Factory’s revival of Little Shop of Horrors and in October of that year the theatrical sensation Stomp opened and has played there for over a decade, but it was annoucned the show would close in January 2018.

Stomp was followed up by Beginning, a new play transferring for a limited run from the National Theatre's Dorfman space. Plans have been announced by the theatre's owners to make the theatre into a space for touring companies, regional theatre and shows with limited runs to have a second life in the West End. Official plans for the theatre - tentatively named the Sondheim Theatre - are yet to by announced by Delfont Mackintosh.


Seating

The auditorium has two levels – Stalls and Dress Circle. Whilst an intimate space, there are a couple of obstacles patrons may wish to be aware of.

In the Stalls, the rake of the seating becomes obvious from Row E and is quite a sharp rake, but the last two rows are set lower than those in front. The overhang of the Dress Circle affects the view from Row M.

The Dress Circle is not affected by an overhang, but the legroom on this level is not ideal.


Facilities At Ambassadors Theatre

Seat plan: Ambassadors Theatre Seat Plan
Facilities: Air conditioned
Bar
Infrared hearing loop
Toilets


Access description: 15cm step into foyer. Box Office to left. 26 steps down to Stalls. 5 steps up to Dress Circle with 3 steep steps between rows. Staircases have highlights and handrails on both sides. Venue open 30 mins before performance.

Sound Amplification: Induction Loop Necklace: suitable for persons wearing a hearing aid. The induction loop is worn around the neck and the hearing aid needs to be switched to the ‘T’ setting. The loop has adjustable volume control. Headset: This device amplifies the sound through earpieces similar to headphones. Suitable for persons without hearing aids.

Guide Dogs: Guide dogs allowed inside auditorium – please ask for an aisle seat or row F in the Circle. Dogs can also be looked after by theatre staff with prior arrangement.

Disabled Access: No spaces for wheelchair users. Transfer seating for 2 people is possible to row F in the Circle (up 5 steps).

Toilets: No adapted toilets. Regular toilets on various levels.


Nearest tube: Leicester Square
Tube lines: Piccadilly, Northern
Location: West End
Railway station: Charing Cross
Bus numbers: (Charing Cross Road) 14, 19, 38, 24, 29, 176
Night bus numbers: (Charing Cross Road) 14, 24, 176, N5, N19, N29, N38, N41, N279
Car park: Chinatown (5mins)
Within congestion zone?: Yes
Directions from tube: (5mins) Take Cranbourn Street away from Leicester Square until St Martin’s Lane, where you head left up to West Street. The theatre’s on your left past St Martin’s Theatre.