English National Ballet: Manon Tickets

London Coliseum St Martin's Lane, London, WC2N 4ES
Performance Timings
Monday - -
Tuesday - -
Wednesday - 19:30
Thursday 14:30 19:30
Friday - 19:30
Saturday 14:30 19:30
Sunday 14:30 -
Show Info

Book English National Ballet: Manon Tickets

Kenneth MacMillan’s full-blooded ballet of love, decadence and passion

The young and naïve Manon is torn between two lives: privilege and opulence with the wealthy Monsieur GM, or innocent love with the penniless student Des Grieux. Wanting it all will be her downfall.

Aristocrats and beggars, courtesans and harlots fill the stage to take you from a gambling den in 18th-century Paris to a desolate Louisiana swamp, and share with you one of British ballet’s most dramatic stories.

Famous for its expressive choreography and acting demands, Manon features some of the most challenging and fulfilling roles in ballet.

Let English National Ballet and its Philharmonic orchestra sweep you up, to the haunting music of Julies Massenet. 4 stars The Sunday Telegraph, The Times, The Sunday Express, The Daily Telegraph

Age Recommendation| The venue do not permit children under 5 years old.

Important information

Running time
2 hours 40 minutes including two intervals
Booking Until
Sat, 19 January 2019
Venue Info

London Coliseum

St Martin's Lane, London, WC2N 4ES

VIEW SEATING PLAN


London Coliseum

Address: St Martin's Lane, London, WC2N 4ES
Capacity: 2359


With 2,359 seats, the London Coliseum is the largest theatre in London’s West End. It was designed for Sir Oswald Stoll by Frank Matcham, the leading theatre architect of his day.


Quick facts

the London Coliseum has the widest proscenium arch in London (55 feet wide and 34 feet high)
the stage is 80 feet wide, with a throw of over 115 feet from the stage to the back of the balcony
it was one of the first theatres to have electric lighting
it was built with a revolving stage which consisted of three concentric rings and was 75 feet across in total and cost Stoll £70,000
the theatre was one of the first two places in Britain to sell Coca-Cola (the other was Selfridges)

The 'people's palace of entertainment'
The vision was to create a theatre of variety, in the largest and most impressive theatre in London.

Designed by Sir Oswald Stoll, Stoll’s ambition was to create the largest and finest ‘people’s palace of entertainment’ of the age.

The theatre’s original slogan was Pro Bono Publico (for the public good). It was opened in 1904 and the inaugural performance was a variety bill on 24 December that year.

The original programme was a mix of music hall and variety theatre, with the grand finale – a full-scale revolving chariot race – requiring the stage to revolve.


Second World War

The theatre changed its name from the London Coliseum to the Coliseum Theatre between 1931 and 1968.

During the Second World War, the Coliseum served as a canteen for Air Raid Precaution (ARP) wardens, and Winston Churchill gave a speech from the stage.

After 1945 the theatre was mainly used for American musicals before becoming a cinema for seven years from 1961.


The home of opera sung in English

In 1968 the theatre reopened as the London Coliseum, when it also became the home of Sadler’s Wells Opera with a new pit created to accommodate a large opera orchestra.

In 1974 Sadler’s Wells became English National Opera, reflecting the company’s position in the heart of national culture.

As well as being the home of opera sung in English, dance also continued to play an important part in the life of the London Coliseum – a fact that continues to this day with many national and international dance companies performing at the theatre during the breaks between ENO productions.


Restoration

The company bought the freehold of the building for £12.8 million in 1992. The theatre underwent a complete and detailed restoration from 2000 which was supported by National Heritage Lottery Fund, English Heritage, the National Lottery through Arts Council England, Vernon and Hazel Ellis and a number of generous trust and individual donors to whom we are extremely grateful.

The auditorium and other public areas were returned to their original Edwardian decoration and new public spaces were created. An original staircase planned by Frank Matcham was finally put in to his specifications. The theatre re-opened in 2004


Present day

In 2015, ENO announced a plan to open up the London Coliseum with a redevelopment of the front of house spaces, intended to encourage more people in to explore the beautiful interiors of the theatre.

The renovation project focused on the architectural qualities of the Grade II* listed building to reclaim its original Edwardian elegance for a new generation of audiences.


Radio-wave system in the auditorium and induction loop at box office and all bars.

Guide dogs allowed into auditorium, alternatively staff are happy to dog sit in the manager's office.

10 spaces for wheelchair/scooter users in total: 2 at back of Dress circle, 4 in Stall boxes and 4 at back of Stalls (companions can sit beside the wheelchairs users). 10 wheelchair/scooter transfer spaces: 4 in Dress Circle and 6 in Balcony. Theatre also provides 2 wheelchairs for loan.

No steps to toilets off the foyer. More toilets at Dress Circle, Upper Circle (women's 10 steps up), Balcony and Basement.

Adapted toilets at Basement, Stalls, Dress Circle (no steps from lift) and Balcony levels.

Good leg room in stalls; B1-4, B33-36, C1 and C39 in the Stalls provide the best leg room.

No steps to Stalls bar and bars in rear Stalls corridor. Further bars at Balcony, Upper and Dress Circles can be accessed by main lift. Dutch Bar on basement level (reachable by lift) accessed by platform lift or down 3 steps. Drinks cannot be taken into the auditorium.

Telephones are 10 steps down from the foyer


Facilities At London Coliseum 

Seat plan: London Coliseum Seat Plan
Facilities: Air conditioned
Bar
Disabled toilets
Infrared hearing loop
Toilets
Wheelchair accessible

Nearest tube: Leicester Square
Tube lines: Piccadilly, Northern
Location: West End
Railway station: Charing Cross
Bus numbers: 24, 29, 176 / 6, 9, 11, 13, 15, 23, 87, 91, 139
Night bus numbers: 24, 176, N5, N20, N29, N41, N279 / 6, 23, 139, N9, N15, N11, N13, N21, N26, N44, N47, N87, N89, N91, N155, N343, N551
Car park: Q-Park: Chinatown (5mins) / Other: St Martin's Lane Hotel (1min)
Within congestion zone?: Yes
Directions from tube: (3mins) Take Cranbourn Street until St Martin’s Lane, where you head right until you reach the theatre.