The Great Gatsby Tickets

Gatsby's Drugstore 84 Long Lane, LONDON SE1 4AU
Important Info
The Great Gatsby Child Policy

The show is suitable for ages 14+. Anyone under the age of 18 will need to be accompanied by an adult over the age of 18. ID is required.


Important Information

Please note: This is an immersive theatre production without seating where guests are encouraged to walk around, mingle and have a drink. 1920s attire is welcomed, although not essential. Recommended for ages 14 and above.
Performance Timings
Monday - -
Tuesday - -
Wednesday - 19:30
Thursday - 19:30
Friday - 19:30
Saturday 15:00 19:30
Sunday - 18:00
Show Info

Book The Great Gatsby Tickets

“The Great Gatsby at the Gatsby's Drugstore - now booking through the end of the year due to overwhelming demand!”

"The honour would be entirely mine if you would attend my little party."

It’s the roaring twenties – an era of bootleg liquor, red hot jazz and hedonistic pleasures. Jay Gatsby has invited you to one of his infamous parties and that's not an invite you want to turn down.

Step into a heart-racing immersive adaptation of F Scott Fitzgerald’s seminal jazz-age novel which puts you in the heart of the action. Slip on your dancing shoes and watch the story unfold around you in this unique theatrical performance.

The cocktails are flowing, the music is playing, the party is in full swing and there’s the chance of more than a little scandal. Immerse yourself in one of the greatest stories of the 20th Century.

1920’s DRESS ENCOURAGED, DANCING SHOES REQUIRED. 


The Great Gatsby Child Policy

The show is suitable for ages 14+. Anyone under the age of 18 will need to be accompanied by an adult over the age of 18. ID is required.


Important Information

Please note: This is an immersive theatre production without seating where guests are encouraged to walk around, mingle and have a drink. 1920s attire is welcomed, although not essential. Recommended for ages 14 and above.

Important information

Running time
2 hour including interval
Booking Until
Sun, 31 March 2019
Cast

The Great Gatsby Cast

By: Based on the novel by F Scott Fitzgerald, it is written by Alex Wright and The Original Company.
Director: Alex Wright
Design: Casey Andrews


Cast List

Ollie Tilney (Jay Gatsby), Louise Williams (Daisy Buchanan), Thomas Maller (Tom Buchanan), Dan Dingsdale (Nick Carraway), Holly Beasley-Garrigan (Jordan Baker), Veronica Hare (Myrtle Wilson), Phil Grainger (George Wilson), Imogen Little (Kitty), alongside an ensemble including Jessica Guise, Toby Gordon and Ollo Clark.
Reviews

The Great Gatsby Critics & Reviews

TIME OUT SAYS ***


This immersive adaptation of the novel is a fun night out, if not great theatre

'The Great Gatsby' is back for Spring 2018. This review is from March 2017.

Who wouldn’t want to have a drink with Jay Gatsby? He’s charming and mysterious, and throws one hell of a party. The man is a hoot! But if you’re hoping to get intimate with F Scott Fitzgerald’s romantic hero – to really get stuck into his beautiful enveloping novel – then this immersive pastiche isn’t for you. This is a chance to get pissed with Gatsby and friends, but don’t expect any late night revelations.

Event company The Guild of Misrule have past form with immersive nights and it all feels polished and professional. And Alexander Wright’s show moves fluidly enough, as the cast subtly shepherd us from one play space to the next: a large dance area (Charleston anyone?), a pretty but pricey bar (who’s up for a £160 bottle of champers?) and a few smaller spaces for slightly more intimate encounters.

It’s all quite jolly, but the scenes – largely plucked directly from the novel – make little impact. Nick Carraway (Daniel Dingsdale) crawls over the bar and recites some of Fitzgerald’s most haunting prose, but no one’s really listening. Gatsby (Oliver Tilney, charmer) and Daisy (Amie Burns Walker) finally reunite, but we couldn’t give a fig. Poor Myrtle is killed, Tom spurned and Nick seduced but none of the moments – clipped and context-free – feel meaningful.

There’s none of the desperate heat, heart, longing and loneliness that swirls through Fitzgerald’s novel. A centrepiece of this year’s Vault Festival, the venue has been draped in gold tinsel and enthusiastically spruced up by designer Robert Readman, yet there’s no feeling of crazy, urgent excess. The actors are dressed in gorgeous period costumes but the roaring ’20s never quite roar (not helped by bursts of contemporary music). The most convincing component is the audience: dressed up to the nines, cheeky as hell and gloriously drunk.



BY: MIRIAM GILLINSON

Ref Link: Time Out



The Gurdian ****


The Great Gatsby review – get immersed in jazz-age hedonism
41 Monkgate, York

F Scott Fitzgerald’s novel comes to life in the Guild of Misrule’s fancy-dress interpretation, though you may be too busy playing spin the bottle to hear the whole story Myths abound as to the location where the hero of F Scott Fitzgerald’s novel threw his legendary parties. Was it Long Island’s fabled Beacon Towers? Or was Gatsby’s house inspired by other great Gold Coast mansions, such as Land’s End and Oheka Castle?

Now it can be revealed that Gatsby actually inhabits a former nonconformist chapel in York. Since it was first presented last year, the Guild of Misrule’s immersive Gatsby experience has developed into a cult jazz-age fancy-dress party in which it is difficult to be sure if you’re mingling with the cast or another member of the audience. In any case, non-participation is not an option: within minutes you’re required to put down your cocktail and learn how to charleston.

There’s nothing quite like getting lost in a good book, and over the next couple of hours this is pretty much what happens. Alexander Wright’s production features some scripted set-pieces, though your journey through the narrative is governed largely by chance – I spent quite a lot of time circulating the subplot, playing spin-the-bottle with the blue-collar characters Myrtle and her car-mechanic husband George, who also plays a mean stride piano.

And in a very Gatsby-esque sense, I never properly got to meet the host; though I think I may have been implicated in an underworld plot to expose him. It leaves you with a sense of having flipped through The Great Gatsby at random rather than followed it cover-to-cover, though the conviction of the acting, the quality of the music and the frenetic explosions of flapper dancing distil the spirit of the book like liquor in a prohibition-era teapot. And it’s a workable solution to the main difficulty of dramatising the novel, which is that incessant hedonism can be incredibly boring to watch. Baz Luhrmann’s overlong, overhyped film might have been a whole lot more engaging if you could have joined in. Well, now you can.

At 41 Monkgate, York, until 7 January. Box office: 01904 623568. Then at Vault festival, London, from 25 January to 5 March.


By :
Alfred Hickling

Ref Link : The Guardian 
Venue Info

Gatsby's Drugstore

84 Long Lane, LONDON SE1 4AU

VIEW SEATING PLAN

Photos

The Great Gatsby Photo Gallery