Aladdin Tickets

Prince Edward Theatre Old Compton Street, London, W1D 4HS
Important Info
AGE RESTRICTIONS:

ALADDIN 
is recommended for a general audience. As an advisory to adults who might bring young people, Disney recommends ALADDIN for ages 6 and up. Children under the age of 3 will not be admitted into the theatre. All persons aged 16 or under must be accompanied and sat next to the accompanying adult. They may not sit on their own within the auditorium. If children do have separate seats you could be refused entry. All persons entering the theatre, regardless of age, must have a ticket.

Please note there will be an auditorium blackout of 8 seconds around 45 minutes into the performance. 

This production contains theatrical smoke & fog effects, pyrotechnics, strobe lighting & loud noises
Performance Timings
Monday - 19:30
Tuesday - 19:30
Wednesday - 19:30
Thursday 14:30 19:30
Friday - 19:30
Saturday 14:30 19:30
Sunday - -
Show Info

Book Aladdin Tickets


Walt Disney Theatricals brought their Tony Award nominated production of Aladdin the Musical to London's West End at the Prince Edward Theatre in May 2016. Since opening on Broadway at the New Amsterdam Theatre on 20 March 2014, the show has been enjoyed by thousands of audience members from around the world, bringing the colourful and memorable tale to life in a unique and dazzling way.

Directed and choreographed by Casey Nicholaw (The Book of Mormon, Something Rotten), the show leaps to the stage bursting with dramatic flair and boundless energy. The musical stays true to the original 1991 animated feature, and tells the story of Aladdin, a street urchin who meets and falls in love with Princess Jasmine. However, Jasmine can only marry a prince, but all is not lost as Aladdin owns a magic lamp, and with the help of its Genie sets out to win the hand of his princess in marriage.

The Aladdin the Musical cast in London includes: Matthew Croke (Aladdin), Jade Ewen (Jasmine), Trevor Dion Nicholas (Genie), Don Gallagher (Jafar), Nick Cavaliere (Iago), Irvine Iqbal (Sultan), Leon Craig (Babkak), Daniel de Bourg (Kassim), Miles Barrow (Omar)


Aladdin the Musical - Facts and Figures

Each production uses 337 unique costumes designed by Tony Award winner Gregg Barnes. Each costume was handcrafted for the show, using fabric from 9 different countries including Morocco, Turkey, Italy, Germany and China.

1,428 Swarovski crystals are sewn into one chorus members' costume for the finale section of "Friend Like Me".

The Broadway production of Aladdin features 84 illusions and effects, including the Genie appearing and vanishing and the memorable magic carpet ride which accompanies the song "A Whole New World".

Composer Alan Menken has been nominated for 19 Academy Awards, and has won 8 - primarily for his work with Walt Disney Studios. Collectively, the creative team have won an amazing 17 Tony Awards for direction, choreography, set design, lighting design and music.

Disney on Broadway is responsible for nine full productions, beginning with Beauty and the Beast in 1994, through to The Lion King in 1997, Aida in 2000, Mary Poppins in 2004, Tarzan in 2006, The Little Mermaid in 2008, Peter and the Starcatcher and Newsies in 2012, Aladdin in 2014 and Frozen in 2018.


Disney's Aladdin Synopsis

Set in the fictional Arabian town of Agrabah, orphan 'street rat' Aladdin spends his days foraging for food and trying to stay one jump ahead of the palace guards. High up in the palace, Princess Jasmine feels trapped by the Sultan’s insistence that she find a suitable husband, resentful of the notion that she must marry for status rather than for love. A chance meeting between the Princess and the street rat instantly sparks a connection, though the path to a perfect ending does not run smoothly.

Set a mission by the Sultan’s evil right-hand man Jafar, Aladdin must retrieve a magical lamp from the mystical Cave of Wonders. Just one rub of the lamp unleashes the Genie within, and with his help, Aladdin attempts to thwart Jafar’s evil plans and win the Princess’ heart. Using the three wishes the Genie grants him, will Aladdin’s new persona, ‘Prince Ali’, be enough to save Agrabah and convince the Sultan that he truly is a ‘diamond in the rough’?


Disney's Aladdin Child Policy 

ALADDIN is recommended for a general audience. As an advisory to adults who might bring young people, Disney recommends ALADDIN for ages 6 and up. Children under the age of 3 will not be admitted into the theatre. All persons aged 16 or under must be accompanied and sat next to the accompanying adult. They may not sit on their own within the auditorium. If children do have separate seats you could be refused entry. All persons entering the theatre, regardless of age, must have a ticket.

Please note there will be an auditorium blackout of 8 seconds around 45 minutes into the performance.

This production contains theatrical smoke & fog effects, pyrotechnics, strobe lighting & loud noises.

Important information

Running time
2 hours 35 minutes
Booking Until
Sat, 31 August 2019
Cast

Aladdin Cast

By: Chad Beguelin
Producer: Walt Disney Theatricals
Director: Casey Nicholaw
Songs by: Alan Menken, Howard Ashman, Tim Rice & Chad Beguelin
Lighting: Natasha Katz
Sound: Ken Travis
Design: Bob Crowley
Choreography: Casey Nicholaw
Costume: Gregg Barnes

Cast list:
Matthew Croke (Aladdin), Jade Ewen (Jasmine), Trevor Dion Nicholas (Genie), Don Gallagher (Jafar), Nick Cavaliere (Iago), Irvine Iqbal (Sultan), Miles Barrow (Omar), Leon Craig (Babkak), Daniel de Bourg (Kassim), Chanelle Anthony, Danny Becker, Cindy Belliot, Filippo Coffano, Nolan Edwards, Sinead Kenny, Travis Kerry, Dann Kharsa, Tarisha Rommick, Joshua Steel, Monica Swayne, Niko Wirachman, Arran Anzani-Jones, Albey Brookes, Lauren Chia, Bianca Cordice, Cavin Cornwall, Melanie Elizabeth, Kade Ferraiolo, Antony Hewitt, Mitch Leow, Oliver Lidert, Ian Oswald, Kyle Seeley, Sadie-Jean Shirley, Ricardo Spriggs, Kayleigh Thadani and Jermaine Woods.
Reviews

Aladdin Critics & Reviews


Dazzling and eye-popping! A magical, wonderful extravaganza!

Review by Marilyn Stasio from Variety
Seriously, it's amazing!

Review by Joe Dziemianowicz from NY Daily News
The new Disney blockbuster!

Review by Mark Kennedy from Associated Press
It's Genie-us! It delivers a rush that will surprise you!

Review by Elysa Gardner from USA Today
Fabulous! Extravagant!

Review by Charles Isherwood from The New York Times


Review: Disney Aladdin, The West End musical at Prince Edward Theatre
Elizabeth Hartland

*****

This energetic, riotous adaption of color, magic, and song will have you singing along, tapping your feet and smiling from ear to ear

We’re all familiar with the story of Aladdin: ‘diamond in the rough’ Aladdin meets and falls in love with Princess Jasmine and, with a help from a larger-than-life Genie he gets the chance to prove he’s worthy of her affection. Throw in Jasmine’s sweet yet overbearing father, the Sultan, the Sultan’s evil personal adviser Jafar and Jafar’s trusty side-kick Iago and unfortunately, all doesn’t run smoothly for poor Aladdin.

The 1992 Disney animated film holds a special place in many hearts, and it isn’t easy to translate all that magic that many hold so dear onto the stage.

It’s clear that a lot of hard work has gone into the West End show. Award-winning scenic designer Bob Crawley has created spectacular sets and curated mind-blowing special effects. Put that together with the colorful, and jewel-encrusted, the costumed cast of 30, this production is a feast for the eyes.

Remaining true to the tale, with just a few minor details amended to suit the theatre, audiences still get to enjoy the timeless songs, the breathtaking scenery, and magic of the story, and the characters we know and love. Abu has been replaced with three cheery, fellow street rats and Iago (fantastically played by Jermaine Woods) is now a loud, impish sort of man who is just as catty, provocative and quick-witted as the parrot we remember from the film.

Voiced by the late Robin Williams, the Genie was the stand-out star of Disney’s 1992 animation, and Trevor Dion Nicholas’ portrayal certainly does the character justice. Dressed head-to-toe in outlandish color and, of course, covered in sequins and glitter, his infectious exuberance leaves the audience longing for the Genie to spring from the lamp. You just wait to you see the all singing, all dancing spectacle of the show-stopping ‘Friend Like Me’.

though beautifully sang by Matthew Croke and Jade Ewen, the well-known Whole New World’ was slightly upstaged by the visual splendor that was the magic carpet ride against a bejeweled night’s sky. Illusion designer Jim Steinmeyer created a stunning scene – with no strings in sight!

Moments of mischief and naughty quips added to the magic of the evening, bringing a story told over 20 years ago bang up-to-date. Kudos to Trevor Dion Nicholas for ‘flossing’ – I didn’t think anyone over 21 could do that!

As cheesy as it sounds, it has something to offer audiences young and old. This energetic, riotous adaption of color, magic, and song will have you singing along, tapping your feet and smiling from ear to ear.

Aladdin’s global presence has grown to six productions on four continents, and it has been seen by more than 7.2 million people to date.

Opened to critical acclaim at the Prince Edward Theatre on June 15, 2016, Aladdin enters its third year at the West End. Aladdin will play Monday to Saturday at 7.30pm with matinee performances on Thursday and Saturday at 2.30pm.
Venue Info

Prince Edward Theatre

Old Compton Street, London, W1D 4HS

VIEW SEATING PLAN


Prince Edward Theatre

Address: 28 Old Compton Street, London, W1D 4HS
Capacity: 1650

Designed by Edward A. Stone and opening in 1930, the Prince Edward Theatre was named after the then Prince of Wales, who went on to become Edward VIII. The interior of the theatre was lavishly decorated in an art deco style by Marc Henri and Laverdet, using gold and shades of warm fuchsia. By 1935, Edward A. Stone had converted the space into a dance and cabaret hall, and the name was changed to “London Casino”. The casino proved to be a great commercial success, but was badly damaged in an awful World War II air raid in May 1941, which saw the building lose all of its windows.

By 1954, the theatre had been adapted into a cinema, using the latest innovation from New York, the Cinerama. The architects Frank Baessler and T. & E. Braddock designed the interior changes to incorporate three large projectors in the Stalls which were projected onto a curved screen. The way that the cinema was designed meant that the view of the screen from the Upper Circle would not have been good, and that level of the theatre was closed, reducing the seating capacity to 1337. Famous films shown at the cinema include 2001 A Space Odyssey (1968) and Ben-Hur (1969).

Demand for Cinerama fell off in the 1970s, and by 1978 RHWL Architects were in the process of converting the building back into theatrical use, with the name of Prince Edward Theatre being reinstated. The theatre reopened on 21st June 1978 with Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s new musical, Evita, making a star of its leading lady, Elaine Paige. The 8 year run of Evita was followed by Tim Rice’s next musical, Chess, written with the men from ABBA, Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, and also starring Elaine Paige. Miss Paige returned to the same theatre again in 1989 with a revival of Cole Porter’s Anything Goes.

Now that the theatre was firmly established as a house for musicals, the building was completely refurbished in 1992. Bernard Delfont and Cameron Mackintosh now owned the theatre, and spent over £3 million on remodelling the auditorium, improving the acoustics and increasing the size of the stage. The new Prince Edward Theatre was unveiled in March 1993 with the opening of Crazy for You, a Gershwin musical transferring from Broadway.

Musicals have played consistently here since, including the hugely successful Mamma Mia! (1999), Mackintosh’s own production of Mary Poppins (2004), the 2014 revival of Boublil and Schönberg’s Miss Saigon, and the theatre’s current tenant, Aladdin.

Delfont Mackintosh Theatres Ltd. continue to renovate the theatre between productions, making the facilities exemplary and one of the most desirable spaces in the West End.


Seating

The auditorium has three levels – the Stalls, Dress Circle and Grand Circle. In the Stalls, patrons will find excellent legroom throughout, and a gentle rake throughout the auditorium allows for excellent views. The overhang of the Dress Circle will affect the view of the top of the stage from Row S and onwards.

The Dress Circle does not offer the same level of legroom, but again offers great views. The last five rows will have their view obstructed by the overhang of the Grand Circle.The Dress Circle loges are a unique feature to this theatre – they take on the form of individual, tiered boxes but with a direct view of the stage rather than the side-on view usually associated with box seats.

The Grand Circle offers excellent sightlines as the seats are fairly steeply raked, but this rake may induce vertigo in sufferers. Please note that it is quite a walk up to the Grand Circle from the foyer.


Facilities At Prince Edward Theatre 

Seat plan: Prince Edward Theatre Seat Plan
Facilities: Air conditioned
Bar
Disabled toilets
Infrared hearing loop
Toilets
Wheelchair accessible


Access description: 
Level access to the main foyer through double swing doors. Box Office to left and low counter kiosk straight ahead. Most staircases have handrails on both sides. 13 steps up to the Dress Circle from the foyer (3 steps between rows). 22 steps down to the Stalls, 41 to the front of the Grand Circle and 72 to the back. Venue is carpeted throughout.

Sound Amplification: Sennheiser system with 40 headsets available from access host for a £5 refundable deposit.

Guide Dogs: 2 guide dogs are allowed inside the auditorium. Staff can also look after them if you arrange this when you book.

Disabled Access: Entrance to the auditorium through a double EXIT door opening outwards on Greek Street, then up a very short, steep ramp to Box 1, where there are 2 spaces for wheelchair users and 2 companions. Transfer seating is available to row A. Venue is suitable for scooter transfers only. The theatre is able to store a maximum of 2 wheelchairs and one scooter per performance, next to the EXIT door.

Toilets: Men’s and women’s at Dress Circle level, Grand Circle level and Stalls level. There is an additional ladies toilet in the Stalls bar..

Disabled Toilets: Adapted toilet on right-hand side of foyer. Patrons requiring the adapted toilets have to go out of the exit on Greek Street and back to the foyer entrance on Old Compton Street.


Nearest tube: Leicester Square
Tube lines: Piccadilly, Northern
Location: West End
Railway station: Charing Cross
Bus numbers: (Shaftesbury Avenue) 14, 19, 38; (Charing Cross Road) 24, 29, 176
Night bus numbers: (Shaftesbury Avenue) 14, N5, N19, N20, N38; (Charing Cross Road) 24, 176, N29, N41, N279
Car park: Chinatown (3mins)
Within congestion zone?: Yes
Directions from tube: (5mins) Take Charing Cross Road until you reach the crossroads with Shaftesbury Avenue. Passing the Palace Theatre, take Langley Mow on the left and follow it on.

Photos

Aladdin Photo Gallery